Posts Tagged: science

Link

Physics - Bird Flocks Shatter on Impact

Me: [reading from the synopsis] “…This has led Nicholas Ouellette and Pearson Miller at Yale University to question what would happen if the flock flew into a wall.”

Office mate: So they simulated bird flocks?

Me: Thank heavens, yes.

Photo

At the risk of revealing myself as a complete geek: I like the new format the APS is using for its journals online.

Source: journals.aps.org
Text

Roses are red,
Violets are red,
There is no pain,
You are receding at a speed approaching that of light…

Link

Comment on "Atomic mass compilation 2012" by B. Pfeiffer, K. Venkataramaniah, U. Czok, C. Scheidenberger

This might be a bit of inside baseball, but:

For years, one international collaboration, the Atomic Mass Evaluation (or AME) collaboration, has periodically published review papers recommending values to be quoted for the known atomic masses based on previous experimental results. An unrelated group is publishing its own compilation in March. This is a comment on that work by the AME collaboration, and it is remarkable for its bluntness. If you’ve ever wondered what a nuclear physics beef looks like, this is your chance.

Photo
Video

This is great: how to demonstrate gravitational concepts using Lycra stretched over a hoop and some weights.

(by apbiolghs via Scout Magazine)

Source: youtube.com
Photo
Photo

See that red star at top left of Orion? That’s Betelgeuse. It’s a red supergiant. After exhausting the supply of hydrogen in its core it began to contract under its own gravity. Hydrogen fusion resumed in a shell around the core as its density and temperature increased, causing that outer layer to expand and turning it from a so-called “main sequence” star into a bright, luminous giant. Reactions involving helium started as that burned out, blowing the outer envelopes of the star out even further and creating carbon and oxygen (all of which, by the way, has been created in red giant stars). The star will ultimately proceed through multiple stages of fusion, contraction, and more fusion producing ever-heavier elements – neon, magnesium, sodium, silicon, and eventually iron – before collapsing and exploding as a type II supernova.

Betelgeuse and I have had a love-hate relationship since the early ’90s, but I think we’re on good terms these days.

Source: burro.astr.cwru.edu
Link
Link

Researcher stumbles on possible new tick species inside own nose | The Verge

Admit it: you just scratched your own nose, didn’t you?

(via @scalzi)